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Archives: 2013

Best Wishes for the Season

During this joyous time of year, we tend to reflect on where we’ve been and look forward to where we’re going. Many of us have celebrated important milestones this year including marriages, new jobs, or new babies and grandchildren. Several may have had experiences that have tested our resolve yet revealed unknown strengths. This year the Allen & Furr agency celebrated our increased capacity in...

By the Numbers

UP TEN OVER TEN - The national debt of the US government rose from $6.783 trillion on 9/30/03 to $16.738 trillion on 9/30/13, an increase of $9.955 trillion over the last 10 fiscal years (source: Treasury Department AUTOPILOT — Some of the spending by the US government increases automatically year-after-year with no required input from Congress. These "automatic stabilizers" increased federal spending by $422 billion...

Campus Fire Safety: Safety Tips for Students

Each year college and university students, on- and off-campus, experience hundreds of fire-related emergencies nationwide. There are several specific causes for fires on college campuses, including cooking, intentionally set fires, overloaded power strips and open flame. Overall, most college-related fires are due to a general lack of knowledge about fire safety and prevention. For most students, the last fire safety training they received was in...

Don’t Be Scared, Be Prepared

September is National Preparedness Month and the staff of Allen & Furr encourages individuals, families and businesses to take this opportunity to prepare for emergencies. The annual event serves as a reminder that we should take action to plan, prepare and stay informed about emergency situations. When preparing for emergencies, first consider basic needs like fresh water, food, clean air and warmth.  The following items are...

Labor Day: A Celebration for Workers

Observed on the first Monday in September, Labor Day symbolizes the end of summer for many.  It was actually created by the labor movement in the late 19th century as a “workingmen’s holiday.” In the late 1800s, at the height of the Industrial Revolution in the United States, the average American worked 12-hour days and seven-day weeks in order to eke out a basic living...